The term ‘Kaavad’ is derived from the word ‘Kivad’, meaning door, a reference to its form. 
To make the Kaavad, wood from the Adusa tree has to be cut on days when the moon is waning. The wood has to be seasoned in the sun for six months before work can begin. The storytellers travel with their Kaavads across the sandy terrain of Rajasthan, to their hereditary patrons, purifying their homes and regaling them with stories of their ancestors, recounting their genealogies as they point at the images with a peacock feather. Historically, the Kaavad would have facilitated access to the divine. The sandy terrain would make it difficult to build temples while the hierarchical and feudal system would have excluded many from the existing temples. 
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The term ‘Kaavad’ is derived from the word ‘Kivad’, meaning door, a reference to its form. 
To make the Kaavad, wood from the Adusa tree has to be cut on days when the moon is waning. The wood has to be seasoned in the sun for six months before work can begin. The storytellers travel with their Kaavads across the sandy terrain of Rajasthan, to their hereditary patrons, purifying their homes and regaling them with stories of their ancestors, recounting their genealogies as they point at the images with a peacock feather. Historically, the Kaavad would have facilitated access to the divine. The sandy terrain would make it difficult to build temples while the hierarchical and feudal system would have excluded many from the existing temples. 
Zoom Info

The term ‘Kaavad’ is derived from the word ‘Kivad’, meaning door, a reference to its form. 
To make the Kaavad, wood from the Adusa tree has to be cut on days when the moon is waning. The wood has to be seasoned in the sun for six months before work can begin. The storytellers travel with their Kaavads across the sandy terrain of Rajasthan, to their hereditary patrons, purifying their homes and regaling them with stories of their ancestors, recounting their genealogies as they point at the images with a peacock feather. Historically, the Kaavad would have facilitated access to the divine. The sandy terrain would make it difficult to build temples while the hierarchical and feudal system would have excluded many from the existing temples. 
Zoom Info

The term ‘Kaavad’ is derived from the word ‘Kivad’, meaning door, a reference to its form. 

To make the Kaavad, wood from the Adusa tree has to be cut on days when the moon is waning. The wood has to be seasoned in the sun for six months before work can begin. The storytellers travel with their Kaavads across the sandy terrain of Rajasthan, to their hereditary patrons, purifying their homes and regaling them with stories of their ancestors, recounting their genealogies as they point at the images with a peacock feather. Historically, the Kaavad would have facilitated access to the divine. The sandy terrain would make it difficult to build temples while the hierarchical and feudal system would have excluded many from the existing temples. 

happiness-is-somewhere-else:

have you ever been in one of those moods where you just want to grab everything and rip it from the walls and break everything because you feel broken and you want to scream and kick and cry because nothing feels right and it’s all wrong and you don’t feel right and i don’t know anymore.